You are currently viewing Will the IRS settle for less if you owe them back taxes?

Will the IRS settle for less if you owe them back taxes?

Are you worried about paying back taxes? If you owe the IRS back taxes, they might accept a settlement offer instead of taking you to court. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a reputation for being tough on taxpayers who don’t pay their fair share. They take aggressive action against those who fail to file tax returns or pay their taxes on time. In some cases, the IRS even goes after individuals who haven’t filed tax returns at all. But if you owe back taxes, you may qualify for a payment plan. The IRS offers several options for settling back taxes owed. These include instalment agreements, full payments, partial payments, and lump sum settlements.

Instalment Agreements to Pay Back Taxes

When taxpayers owe back taxes, the IRS usually requires them to pay the full amount in one lump sum. But you may qualify for an instalment agreement to repay your debt if you can prove that you cannot afford to pay the full amount. An instalment agreement allows you to repay your back taxes over time in smaller, more manageable payments. The IRS offers several types of instalment agreements. You can choose which one works best for you.

Full Payment Agreements for Back Taxes

Full payment agreements allow you to repay your taxes in one lump sum. To qualify, you must be able to pay the full amount in one payment. The IRS may offer this option if you have a history of paying your taxes late. You may also qualify if you don’t qualify for an instalment agreement. If you choose this method, the IRS will drop all charges related to the back taxes. However, it will leave on your record the amount you were behind. You can also expect to pay interest on the amount you owe.

Partial Payment Agreement for Back Taxes

A partial payment agreement allows you to repay back taxes in small monthly amounts. You can repay as little as a dollar a month if you qualify. This option may be available if you owe less than 10 times the annual amount of your tax refund. The IRS may offer this option if you don’t qualify for a full payment agreement. If you choose this method, you’ll have to pay a fee each time you make a payment. The fee varies according to your ability to pay: People who can’t afford to make a large payment are charged less than those who can. The fee is added to the amount you owe.

Lump Sum Settlements for Back Taxes

If you owe substantial back taxes, you may qualify for a lump sum settlement. With this option, you repay your debt in a single payment. You may qualify if you owe more than $100,000. Once you make the lump sum payment, the IRS will close your account. The amount you owe will be treated as paid in full. This means you’ll be off the IRS’s radar. A lump sum settlement may be offered by the IRS if you have a history of not paying your taxes. Or you may just owe a large amount.

Should You Accept an Offer from the IRS?

Before you accept an offer from the IRS, consider the following: If you accept an offer, you’ll be responsible for repaying the debt in full. If you can’t meet the terms of the agreement, the IRS may take further action against you. If you don’t have the money to pay the debt in one lump sum, you may be better off with a partial payment agreement. It may take several years to repay a lump sum. This can be a long time to wait while you have the IRS on your back. If you have a history of not paying your taxes, the IRS may be less likely to offer you a settlement. Make sure you meet all the requirements and pay the debt in full to avoid harsher penalties. If you make a partial payment, the debt will remain on your record.

Avoiding Future Tax Troubles

If you have to repay taxes, you may be tempted to ignore the situation. Or you may think it’s better to hide from the IRS than to come to terms with your debt. Avoiding the IRS is never a good idea. It only makes the problem worse. If you have to settle for paying back taxes, you’ll have a better chance at getting your finances in order if you’re honest with the IRS. If you have been avoiding filing your taxes, the IRS may be able to offer you a settlement. If you are experiencing financial hardship, the IRS may be willing to work with you to lower the amount you owe. If you have a history of not paying your taxes, the IRS may be less likely to offer you a settlement. Make sure you meet all the requirements and pay the debt in full to avoid harsher penalties.

Geisha Morris-Jacobs

Geisha Morris-Jacobs is an accountant with over 13 years of experience in accounting, taxes, and estate planning. She has helped dozens of clients with clearing up IRS audits and past tax debts. Geisha is also the owner of Jacobwise & Co., a boutique accounting firm that specializes in helping small businesses grow their revenue and individuals create estates to provide for their loved ones.

Leave a Reply